Daily Prompt: Paint

OK! OK, so I’ll paint, hope you like it. Media used, water colours.

PAINT

Toucan species

Daily Prompt: Paint
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Daily Post Photo Challenge: Pure

PURE JOY Awhile back now, a field trip to Chambers Wood, near Bardney in Lincolnshire, the year slips my memory at the moment, but was during the winter months. Went and checked it out, was 2008, l…

Source: Daily Post Photo Challenge: Pure

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Daily Post Photo Challenge: Pure

PURE JOY

Awhile back now, a field trip to Chambers Wood, near Bardney in Lincolnshire, the year slips my memory at the moment, but was during the winter months. Went and checked it out, was 2008, late March, sunny, and gone 3 pm when the image was taken. The trip its self started well before 3 pm, somewhere around 10 pm, and was quite eventful for the time of year, it was exceptionally warm though. Although eventful, the climax came at the 3 pm point. We had reached our last port of call it being the reserve centre, and not gone unnoticed was the very active, quite large bird feeding station close to its entrance. However, before the cameras were brought into action we had a thirst to quench, and being as the centre had a café, a quick cup of tea put that to rights. After a quick snack as well, out came the cameras, and what happened next was pure joy. There were Coal Tits, Blue Tits, Great Tits, Long Tail Tits, Gold Finches, Chaffinches, Greenfinches, Siskins, Robins, Blackbirds, and a Great Spotted Woodpecker. All of the latter quite often observed round and about. For me, and not since 1976, had I seen 1, was the abundance of Tree Sparrows. They there, probably in their high tens, maybe close to a 100+. So here for your joy too, is a photo of a bird table crammed full, (well nearly) of the little beauts. Truly a pure joy for me, and sadly I have not been there since, and consequently not seen another since too.

TREE SPARROWS

PASSER MONTANUS

Tree Sparrows – Passer montanus

Please click on image for a larger view, thank you.


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Come In and Sit Down
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Ron Gutzman
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Daily Prompt: Look Up

Look up and search the sky, and there you’ll chance a Swallow, flying very high.

Look Up

Look up and search the sky, and there you’ll chance a Swallow, flying very high. This one took a pity, I’m sure it really did, for it landed on a cable not far from where I was hid. My camera at the ready I fired off a shot. I look up again to thank it, and have another go, but it had taken to  the sky again flying south, south, east. Perhaps back on its journey, back from whence it came, back to sunny Africa away from all the our summer rain!

Swallow
Hirundo rustica

 

WHATS (IN) THE PICTURE – opposites-crossroads

My Garden Bio-Diversity – Birds Continue reading “Daily Prompt: Look Up”

A Photo a Week Challenge

Birds

Picoides pubescens is purported to be the world smallest woodpecker, at 16 to 17.5 CM long. Measured from the tip of the beak to the tail tip. The latter being the standard method used by ornithological scientists. Following those guidelines I have to point out that Dendrocopos minor, at 15 to 16.5 CM in length is the rightful owner to that title. Or am being pedantic, for it was a USA colleague of mine that made that claim. It  was only the fact that I was entering this ‘Photo a Week Challenge’ that I felt the need to check it out. Looks as though he was a little, (no pun intended), confused. If you check this site out ‘about.com ‘, you’ll find that Picoides pubescens, the Downy Woodpecker is the smallest North American woodpecker, no claim to it being the worlds smallest.  This site ‘NatureGate‘ makes no claims to Dendrocopos minor, the Lesser Spotted Woodpecker being the worlds smallest. I now ask myself does it really matter, as a trivia quiz question, maybe?

Lesser Spotted Woodpecker & House Sparrow.
Dendrocopos minor ♂ Bottom – Passer domesticus ♀ Top

 

 

My Garden, its Biodiversity

Welcome! All natural aspects of my garden are explored daily. All my observations are recorded both photographically, and by way of this blog. Hopefully all records will be supported by an image, or 2.

Links:

Links to people who have helped me in my endeavour to find ID’s and sites I have used as reference. To whom, and for which I’m most grateful:
People: Dr Joe Botting – Dr Tristan Bantock – Dr Herbert Nickel
Sites:
British Bugs* – Fauna Europaea – Wikipedia* – Nature Spot – iSpot* – UK Moths – Flora – Botanical Society of Great Britain & Ireland –   National Barkfly Recording Scheme (Britain and Ireland)* – InfluentialPoints,Com – Eakring Birds – BRC Database of Insects and their Food Plants – Ledra
*  Webb sites where my images can be found.

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My Library:

BRITAIN’S HOVERFLIES An introduction to the hoverflies of Britain, 1st and 2nd editions. By Stuart Ball and Roger Morris.*
Insects of Britain and Western Europe by Michael Chinery
COLLINS GEM MUSHROOMS & TOADSTOOLS by Patrick Harding
Collins • NATURE GUIDE BUTTERFLIES & MOTHS OF BRITAIN & EUROPE BY H. Hofmann • T. Marktanner
Collins • NATURE GUIDE BIRDS OF BRITAIN & EUROPE by J. Nicolai • D. Singer • K. Wothe
ANIMAL BIOLOGY by A. J. Grove and G. E, Newell
The WILD THINGS GUIDE TO THE CHANGING PLANTS OF THE BRITISH ISLES by by DR TREVOR DINES WITH SALLY EATON AND CHRIS MYERS*

The Ecology of Running Waters by H. B. N. Hynes Professor of Biology, University of Waterloo, Ontario, Canada

* Books that have used an/a image/s of mine.

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Fauna

Welcome! All natural aspects of my garden are explored daily. All my observations are recorded both photographically, and by way of this blog. Hopefully all records will be supported by an image, or  2.

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Volucella inflate

Click for more info Volucella inflate

 

Volucella pellucens

Click for info on Volucella pellucens

Volucella pellucens

Volucella bombylans

Click for info on Volucella bombylans

Volucella inanis

Click for info on Volucella inanis

Myathropa florae

The bat motif on the posterior half of the thorax makes this one of the easier hoverflies to ID. Can be found in gardens or woodland glades. This specimen was on mint in my garden. In the woodland glades it will often be found hovering in beams of sunlight, where it will readily come to hand.

My garden
Myathropa florae

Megachile (Megachile) centuncularis

I have used the trinomial name here, for Googling use the binomial name. There are 9 species of Megachile on the British list, all can be found on the BWARS site, the link will take you to this species page. The images depict a bee cutting a piece out of a rose leaf, right up to the shot with it flying off with its bounty.

Psyllopsis fraxinicola

So, starting with the 24th June 2016, and right on my front door step the Psyllid, Psyllopsis fraxinicola. It is a member of the Order: Hemiptera, the Suborder, Sternorrhyncha, and the Superfamily: Liviidae, Family, Psyllidae. It belongs to the Genus: Psyllopsis of which there are 3 species, the other 2 being  P. discrepans, and P. fraxiniP. fraxinicola , it will be noted, differs from the other 2 by virtue of its transparent wings.  All 3 are host specific to Ash, Fraxinus species. Overwinters as eggs, hatching in April/May. Adult phenology: June to October. Length: 3 to 3.5 mm.

Adult, male
Psyllopsis fraxinicola adult
Psyllopsis fraxinicola nymph

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Psyllopsis fraxini

Also found on the same tree in my garden, Psyllopsis fraxini, however not on this day. For comparison only.

Psyllopsis fraxini female

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 Psyllopsis discrepans

Not found in my garden, images put up for comparison only.

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Psyllopsis discrepans

 

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Psyllopsis discrepans nymphs

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 Oak Bush Cricket

Not rare locally, in my garden though, definitely so. indeed only the second record for the  Oak Bush Cricket in nearly 30 years. First time it was an adult, this time a nymph. I have put an image up but a not so one. This one was tapped off Elder and was not very obliging, so I will go through my archives and find a better photo, which I will upload at a later date. More….

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Meconema thalassinum

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Vine Weevil

A large weevil, ~11 mm long, parthenogenetic, there are no males, although I have read that males can be produced if the eggs are fertilised, followed by no males have been recorded, strange! It is flightless due to the elytra being fused. The larvae feed on the roots of various plants, likewise with the adults, but only on the leaves. Often found in the home, as it is attracted to light. Scientific classification: Order: Coleoptera. Family: Curculionidae. Subfamily: Entiminae. Tribe: Otiohynchini. Genus: Otiorhynchus

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Otiorhynchus sulcatus

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Oncopsis cf flavicollis

Found on Silver Birch. A facial view is needed to ID this species with any certainty as O. subangulata, which is very similar to O. flavicollis is also found on Silver birch  and both species can be found together. O. flavicollis having more intense face marking with more prominent discoidal spots. Both species are similar in length being 4.5 to 5.5 mm long. Phenology: Adults from May to September, eggs overwinter and hatch in early spring.

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Oncopsis cf flavicollis

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Dioctria baumhaueri

A robber fly. Tapped from Sycamore. Length: ~12 mm. Phenology: From early March to late June

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Heterocypris cf incongruens

Scientific classification: Kingdom: Animalia.  Phylum: Arthropoda. Subphylum: Crustacea Class: Ostracoda  Subclass: Podocopa. Order: Podocopida. Suborder: Cypridocopina. Superfamily: Cypridoidea. Family: Cyprididae.  Genus: Heterocypris. Species: incongruens

Hetocypris
Heterocypris cf incongruens

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Ribautiana tenerrima

National status: Common, except in northern Scotland. Host plants: Brambles and various other flora. Separated from other Ribautiana species by the oblique white lines along the corial-claval suture, but may not be well-defined in some specimens. A good key factor is that the vertex is narrower than the pronotum. Other key points: The darkening at the end of the forewings, the three clear dark dots on the wing margin.

Scientific classification: Kingdom: Animalia. Subkingdom: Eumetazoa. Phylum: Arthropoda. Subphylum: Hexapoda. Class: Insecta. Order: Hemiptera. Suborder: Cicadomorpha. Superfamily: Membracoidea. Family: Cicadellidae. Subfamily: Typhlocybinae. Tribe: Typhlocybini. Genus: Ribautiana. Species: tenerrima. Phenology: Adult: June to December, possibly overwinters. Length 3-3.5 mm

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Ribautiana tenerrima

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Ptilinus pectinicornis

Commonly known as the ‘Fan-bearing Wood-borer’,  of which it is only the male that can fully claim this title as can be seen in the images. It is most definitely a polyphagus eater, it can be found on most of the UK’s decidious trees such as, Ash, Alder, Beech, Elder, Elm, Field Maple, Hornbeam,Norway Maple, Oak, Poplar, Sallow, Sycamore, and there could be more. My specimen was tapped from Common Oak. It is the larvae that do the boring bit only coming close to the surface to pupate, when in early summer, (probaly late spring too), adults can be found emerging from there chosen host when the act of procreation takes place. At to whether the eggs are laid in, or on the tree I don’t know. Of the actual length of time spent at the larval stage I also don’t know, any data aluding to the 2 latter topics will be most appreaciated. For what it is worth that is as much as I know re this species phenoloy traits. Length: 3 to 5 mm.
Scientific classification: Kingdom: Animalia. Subkingdom: Eumetazoa. Phylum. Arthropoda. Subphylum: Hexapoda. Class: Insecta. Order: Coleoptera. Suborder: Polyphaga. Infraorder: Bostrichiformia. Superfamily: Bostrichoidea. Family: Anobiidae. Subfamily: Ptilininae. Genus: Ptilinus. Species:  pectinicornis.

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Ptilinus pectinicornis female
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Ptilinus pectinicornis male

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Hauptidia maroccana

Off Foxglove its main host, can also be found on Campion’s. Please note  that the site British Bugs shows the phenological period for this species as August to March, probably a typo as they have image taken in the months April, May, outside of period the they have suggested. I also have historical records outside of the months suggested by BB. I mention this for the benefit of recorders who might of sought to check this record out, for I know no one one on the iRecord admin will, mind you I love to be proved wrong. Should I get the responses from the cleaner, Date out of seasonal limits, and or, Out of range of known coordinates, then we’ll know they haven’t. Not this particular record but the one I recorded in 2008 is, I think, a 1st for Lincolnshire. Length: 3-3.5 mm.
Scientific classification:

Kingdom: Animalia. Subkingdom: Eumetazoa. Phylum: Arthropoda. Subphylum: Hexapoda. Class: Insecta. Order: Hemiptera. Suborder: Cicadomorpha. Superfamily: Membracoidea. Family: Cicadellidae. Subfamily: Typhlocybinae. Tribe: Erythroneurini. Genus: Hauptidia. Species: maroccana

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Hauptidia maroccana
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Hauptidia maroccana

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Zygina angusta

Z. angusta is a very variable species, and difficult to separate from Z. ordinaria. The male hind tarsus is less than half the length of the hind tibia and the apical segment and apical half the of middle segments are dark. The scutellum tends to be mostly brown, with the anterior corners and sometimes the midline pale. The clavus is darkened between the red bands (unlike Z. flammigera), the extent of which varies greatly. Recorded on a Rambling Rose. Lengyh: 3=3.5 mm.
Thg phenology account on the site, ‘British Bugs’,  is in my opinion, confusing. To say it overwinters on evergreens, followrd by, ‘Adults:: July to  May’, beggers the question, what happened to June? It mighy be considered pedantic by some, but if this data has been fed into the NBN record cleaner, the auttomattic response from it will be, ‘Dates outside of known seasonal limits’, casting the aspersion that my record of the date could be an error. or indeed false. It has been suggested to iRecord by mself, and others, that this anomally, along with others should be corrected. Their response was, ‘We  are aware that the cleaner is not perfect, however things will stay as they are untill funds become available to make correction’. I hasten to add that it is not just me that has issues with iRecord, and its use of the ‘NBN record cleaner’ as it is.
Scientific Classification:
Kingdom: Animalia. Subkingdom: Eumetazoa. Phylum: Arthropoda. Subphylum: Hexapoda. Class: Insecta. Order: Hemiptera. Suborder: Cicadomorpha. Superfamily: Membracoidea. Family: Cicadellidae. Subfamily: Typhlocybinae. Tribe: Erythroneurini. Genus: Zygina. Species angusta.

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Zygina angusta
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Zygina angusta

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Chamaepsylla hartigii

Tapped off Silver Birch. A relatively distinctive species that is closely related to the very difficult Cacopsylla species. The yellow colouring of the body and wings, often with paler genal cones and pronotum, is almost sufficient for recognition. The female terminalia are also extremely long, and easily recognisable. Distribution: Common and widespread on birches across the UK. Phenology: Adult: May-August. Length: 3 mm.
Scientific classification:
Kingdom: Animalia. Subkingdom: Eumetazoa. Phylum: Arthropoda. Subphylum: Hexapoda. Class: Insecta. Order: Hemiptera. Suborder: Sternorrhyncha. Superfamily: Psylloidea. Family: Psyllidae. Genus: Chamaepsylla. Species: hartigii.
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Chamaepsylla hartigii male

 

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Chamaepsylla hartigii

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Eupeodes luniger

Scientific classification: Kingdom: Animalia. Phylum: Arthropoda. Class: Insecta. Order: Diptera. Family: Syrphidae. Genus: Eupeodes. Subgenus: Eupeodes. Species: luniger.

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Anania coronata

Kingdom: Animalia. Subkingdom: Eumetazoa. Phylum: Arthropoda. Subphylum: Hexapoda. Class: Insecta. Order: Lepidoptera. Superfamily: Pyraloidea. Family: Crambidae. Subfamily: Pyraustinae. Genus: Anania. Species: coronata.

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Anania corornata

 

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Javesella discolour

The shorter wings separates J. discolour from J. dubia and J. pellucida , although macropter types do occur
 
Scientific Classification
Order: Hemiptera/ Suborder: Fulgoromorpha. Family: Delphacidae. Subfamily: Delphacinae. Tribe: Delphacini. Genus: Javesella. Subgenus: Javesella. Species: discolour.

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Sow Thistle Leaf Mines

Probable cause, one of the following flies, please do click on them for more information, thank you. Chromatomyia syngenesiae – C. horticola

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Myathropa florae

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Common Ivy Aphid

Aphis (Aphis) hederae. Far more to be found if you follow the more link.  More

 

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Myathropa florae

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Streptopelia decaocto – Collared Dove

Partners  for life, more….
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Comma Butterfly

Polygonia c-album: Considering were into the 2nd month of summer this is the only butterfly for July, there definitely not finding the weather to their liking. More
 

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Common Darter – Sympetrum striolatum

My first Dragonfly this summer, YAY! Had the wrong ID, this is the correct one. For those who did not see/read, I had it up as the hairy dragonfly.

Pete Hillman’s Nature Photography

Hairy Dragonfly

Sympetrum striolatum

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MANY PLUMRD MOTH – ALUCITA HEXCADACTYLA

Many Plumed Moth is, I think, a more appropriate common name, as  its other common name is, ‘The 20 Plume Moth’,. definitely a misnomer, both more vernacular, as in depending on what part of the British Isles one hails from. The scientific name sort of hits tail on the head as it refers to the number of plumes more accurately, as in 6 fingered. Mmm, I’ll have to count them now, as I sure there are more than six. (Space to insert my count) More details can be found here.

 

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Alucita hexadactyla

 

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Unidentified Species 

I will hopefully be able to identify all, or at least some at a later date.

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Cicadellidae indet

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Aphid indet

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Aphid indet, off Silver Birch

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Blog species links – FLORA

Bramble
Goose Grass
Silene dioica
Smooth Sow Thistle
Wall Speedwell
White Lilac

Flora

Common Oak

Quercus robur, also known as the English Oak and probably more PC, the Pedunculate oak. At present I have 3 in my garden, 2 saplings undergoing bonsai treatment and 1 that is, and now a large 15 year old, just over 1 M. tall. For more information on this species please have a look here, where you will find far more data, which would take up to much space on this blog, thank you.

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Quercus robur

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Red Campion

More extensive information, and data will be found here, far more than my blog can handle.

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Silene dioica

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Bramble

Again more information, and data can be found here, far more than I could give, and my blog could handle. I hasten add that I will put up an image of the Brambles in my garden as and when I get one good enough.

Rubus fruticosus agg.

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Wall Speedwell – Veronica Arvensis

A surprise find whilst removing Himalayan Balm seedlings from around the pond. More….

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Goose Grass – Galium aparine

Goose Grass, also  known as Stickyweed, Catchweed, Robin-run-the-hedge, Coachweed, Cleavers, Stickywilly, Sticky Bud, White Bedstraw. More

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Galium aparine

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Smooth Sow Thistle

Sonchus oleraceus: Leaves have a satin bloom, they are not glossy, un-like Perennial Sow-thistle (Corn Sow-thistle). Leaves are pinnatifid have broad lobes, triangular in overall shape apically.

Smooth Sow Thistle
Sow Thistle” width

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Syringa vulgaris

Syringa vulgaris (lilac or common lilac) is a species of flowering plant in the olive family Oleaceae, native to the Balkan Peninsula, where it grows on rocky hills. This species is widely cultivated as an ornamental and has been naturalized in other parts of Europe (UK, France, Germany, Italy, etc.), as well as much of North America. It is not regarded as an aggressive species, found in the wild in widely scattered sites, usually in the vicinity of past or present human habitations. More……

White Lilac
Syringa vulgaris (White)

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